Ip Man Wing Chun France 
Through Ip Man's sons the original system is preserved by Grandmaster Samuel Kwok, now represented in France by Lee Coleman.
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The Wing Chun Stance | Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma
 
 
It must be stressed that the Wing Chun training stance is not a stance in which one would fight. Wing Chun Sil Lim Tao stance is called Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma and comes from the first form of Wing Chun Kung Fu.
 
The stance is used to develop the leg muscles and balance from simply standing (Its an Isotomic strength training exercise for thosewho wanted to know, that means it trains muscles to be strong without movement). The first Wing Chun form, Sil Lim Tao or “Little Idea”, is performed with the practitioner remaining in the training stance throughout the form. All of the other hand forms start in this same training stance. So what is the training stance?
 
The training stance can be seen as the practitioner standing feet shoulders width apart with feet pointing inward to form an imaginary triangle, the knees are bent, and the hips are pushed slightly forward, but not to the extent that the practitioner loses balance. This will put stress on the calf and other leg muscles, thereby strengthening them.
 
 
 
Getting into stance or Hoi-Ma, is done by starting with the feet together. Then the knees are bent so ones feet are only just covered i.e. cannot be seen by the practitioner when looking down. The hips are then pushed out. The feet are then twisted on the heel outward so the toes are pointing to the left and right of the body At 180 degrees. Pressure is then put on the balls of the feet before the heels are rotated out from under the body. The feet should then be shoulders width or just over shoulders width apart, pointing into a position approximately one meter from the body, forming an imaginary triangle.
 
Biu Ma Stepping | Wing Chun Thrusting Stance
 
 

 Biu Ma or thrusting stance is used to refer to the kind of stance and footwork developed in Chum Kiu. Wing Chun's stepping is designed to give its practitioner maximum stability, whilst maintaining maximum security from attack. The basic position of one's feet when using Biu Ma is as follows: Feet are approximately shoulders width apart or slightly over, and the feet are at 45 degrees. The power for the stepping comes from ankle strength built through the Achilles tendon, as well as leg strength. The power for the step is thrust from the back leg. The practitioner should power down into the ground with the back leg, and then thrust the power out, remembering to move the front leg first. Always check the position of the feet when in place. Do not leave feet too close together or too far apart. A common mistake is to stand on your toes, but this prevents the generation of extra power in the step, and also compromises the structure of the practitioner.
 
 
Huen Ma Stepping | Circling Wing Chun Stance

Huen Ma or 'circling stance' is the stance and footwork that is developed in the 3rd form Biu Gee. Huen Ma is extremely effective when combined with the footwork of Biu Ma. Huen Ma enables the practitioner to shift weight and change position quickly and safely. Starting from the basic position of Biu Ma, the weight from the back leg is shifted forward onto the front leg as the back leg moves towards it. The front leg then becomes the back leg with the weight now sitting on that leg, and what was previously the back leg is thrust forward. To look at it another way the back leg does a half circle to become the new front leg.
 
The Huen Ma is a very flexible movement and can be used and applied in a multitude of different ways. It can be used to aggressively receive attacks or to circle around your opponent to attack them from a different angle. It can also be used to manoeuvre safely when fighting multiple opponents.
 
 
 

Kuen Kuit of Forms and Stance 

 
YEE JEE KIM YEUNG MA

 

1. Pull in the chest, push out the upper back, and bring in the tail bone.  

2. Fill the Tan Tien with chi and distribute the strength to all parts of the body.  

3. Point the knees and toes inward.  

4. Form a pyramid with the center of gravity in the center.

5. Fists are placed by the side of the ribs but not touching the body.

6. Sink the elbows, the shoulders, and the waist.

7. Hold the head and neck straight and keep the spirit alert.

8. Eyes are level, looking straight ahead, and watching all directions.

9. The mind is free of distractions and the mood is bright.

10. There is no fear when facing the opponent.

11. Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma is the main stance.

12. Develop a good foundation for advanced techniques.

 

 
Some thoughts on the Wing Chun kick

By Dan Knight

If a student came to me and had to learn to fight very quickly the first thing I would teach would be the basic Wing Chun front kick. Why? Because its easy to learn, safe to perform and effective at both attacking and defending. Just because Wing Chun does not have many kicks does not mean kicking should be overlooked. In the next few paragraphs I am going to talk about a few of the different kicks in Wing Chun and how they can be used.

The Front Kick

The most basic kick in Wing Chun and one of the most effective. It can come from the front leg or the back leg when in a fighting stance (Biu Ma, like in Chum Kiu). Kicking off the front leg is very fast but not as powerful as kicking off the back leg which is itself slightly slower. The difference is like the difference between a straight punch and a turning punch (one is faster the other is more powerful). They are the same kick but can be used for different purposes depending on what is most important at the time (quicker time to target or more power). The front kick tends to aim for the knee, crotch, shin or ankle. The front kick strikes with the heel of the foot. Like a punch the kick should not be chambered. The heel (though not the knee) should move in a straight line to the target as its the fastest rout. The kick can be used to stop someone attacking you with a punch or as a take down, particularly when someone is kicking you and their supporting leg can be taken out from under them.
 
The Front kick can also be used to attack a stationary target as a distraction while gaining control of the hands an hitting. A common combination is a front kick to double Pak Sau (to take both guard hands) and punch. The front kick can also be used to counter-attack after defending a punch. It will commonly be used to kick out the side of the knee, which is intended to destroy the knee joint to help take control of the fight.
 
The Side Kick
 

The side kick attacks the same areas as the front kick, namely the knee, shin, groin or ankle. It also uses the heel of the foot, (or in some schools the knife edge of the foot). The side kick is found in the dummy form. In application it is often used after a front kick if the opponent tries to step round towards the back of the Wing Chun practitioner. It can also be used to kick the opponents other leg after using a front kick.

Some important things to note about the side kick is that firstly it has the longest reach of any Wing Chun kick (or punch), this can be handy at keeping people at bay. However due to the fact it the kick involves turning the hips it should not be used as an entry technique as it can be side stepped leaving the practitioner open to counterattacks.
 
Other kicks

 
Wing Chun has a few other kicks, most
of these are a variation of the side kick or front kick. The Tan Kick or lifting Kick done by Ip Chun in Chum Kiu is a little different and it is used to defend. There is also a sweep in the dummy form combined with a double Lap Sau which can be used to trip opponents. The Bong Kick is another defensive kick that is often not taught. The Bong Kick used to be trained on Moi Fa Joig (3 posts stuck in the ground to form a triangle). However when Ip Man moved to Hong Kong from China it became impractical to find somewhere to put posts in the ground. This kick is almost certainly the hardest to perform as it requires both good timing and good positioning. Grandmaster Kwok is one of the few people who can actually use this kick to defend a kick and counter kick in one leg movement. The complex nature of this kick may be another reason why it has been all but dropped from most Wing Chun syllabuses.
 
If the opponent tries to step round towards the back of the Wing Chun practitioner. It can also be used to kick the opponents other leg after using a front kick.
 
Some important things to note about the side kick is that firstly it has the longest reach of any Wing Chun kick (or punch), this can be handy at keeping people at bay. However due to the fact it the kick involves turning the hips it should not be used as an entry technique as it can be side stepped leaving the practitioner open to counterattacks.
 
As previously stated, Wing Chun's stepping is designed to give its practitioner maximum stability, whilst maintaining maximum security from attack. Feet should be slightly over shoulders width apart as this gives maximum stability. Further apart and the balance is too spread and the legs become very vulnerable targets. Any closer and the legs have little balance as all your weight is balancing on a small area. Feet should be at approximately 45 degrees and parallel. If they are both square on in a forward direction, they are immobile, and if they are square on at any direction [see next diagram], they expose the knee joint and shin area to attack.
 
It will also inhibit the practitioner when changing direction to deal with an attack from the side or behind if the feet are square on. Knees should be slightly bent because straight legs break when struck at the knees. Also if the legs are bent, they are like a coiled spring ready to move. Almost all of the practitioner's weight should be on the back leg, which enables for a fast advance and retreat as one leg is thrusting forward, back or to the side. This also means weight does not have to be shifted to kick with the front leg as it can move without disrupting the balance if no weight is on it. Therefore, with the weight on the back leg, front kicks can be performed easily and swiftly. Furthermore, having weight on the back leg prevents an attack to the front leg being as dangerous to your balance. This is useful because the front leg is the most likely to be attacked.
 
The feet should be flat on the floor when stationary as opposed to being up on the toes as this gives a more stable surface on which to fight. It is no use fighting on stilts because your balance, rooting, and overall structure will be compromised. Standing on your toes is like fighting on stilts. The feet should be flat and only push up onto the toes when pushing off during stepping. Once the step is complete, the foot must always be firmly rooted to the ground.